Wrong version of ISDeploymentWizard in SSMS 17.8.1

Wrong version of ISDeploymentWizard in SSMS 17.8.1

The problem

Years ago, with SQL Server 2016 release, Microsoft came up with a separated brand new version of SQL Server Management Studio. It’s been a happy day for the SQL Server community and database developers.

Shortly afterwards, our company started to migrate every instances from older version of SQL Server to the 2016, using SSMS 17.*. Developers have already jumped into Visual Studio 2017 and everything seemed to work like a charm, until we started deploying integration services via the new SSMS, after we converted them to 2016 TargetServerVersion (which is NOT the Project Version).

The TargetServerVersion is the SSIS version, also for the deploy operations, while the Project Version setting tells to Visual Studio how to open projects based on .dtproj specifications on the XML projects definitions.

Some days ago I’ve realized that after updating to the latest build of SSMS (17.8.1), the .ispac deployment is actually executing the latest build of the Integration Services Deployment wizard (aka ISDeploymentWizard.exe). As a result every deploy of .ispac files, regardless trying double click or deploying directly from the Integration Services Catalog, the SSISDB, failed with one of the most scaring error message ever:

“[…] The Script Task <unique_name> uses version 15.0 script that is not supported in this release of Integration Services […]

What? Why? I’ve a workstation with SQL Server 2016 and the related Integration Services 13.0:

blog_ssis_error_001

The computer I’m speaking of has the same build of mine, nobody has installed any other Integration Services versions anywhere. Andy Leonard explained this behavior in this blog post. Unfortunately, in my scenario, I cannot solve the problem.

Let’s try to explain better.

Scenario

The workstation I’m working on has SQL Server 2016 (build 13.0.5149.0) and Integration Services 13.0 on Windows 10 Pro. I’ve got a simple package with a single script task which does literally anything:
blog_ssis_error_002bAs Andy suggested us, I’ve changed the TargetServerVersion to SQL Server 2016, so I’ve got C# 2015 compiler for scripts:

First execution and deploy

Executing it locally, nothing happens, but it happens in a green way (success):

blog_ssis_error_002a.PNG

Ok, now we’re going to deploy to the other machine, generating the .ispac file and double clickin on it. It’s important to make sure that you’re double-cliking the .ispac file. Do not right click on the Integration Service Catalog project folders because SSMS will execute the latest build of ISDeploymentWizard.exe by design.

blog_ssis_error_008b

deploy from SSMS 17.8.1

 

When double clicking, the app selector should use the version related to the TargetServerVersion setting of the .ispac. This works for many of my other computers. But for one of them, here is the screen:

blog_ssis_error_005

double click on .ispac file

Hey! This is 2017 also when clicking on .ispac file. Let’s try to deploy using the new tool. The deploy succeeded.

blog_ssis_error_006.PNG

And now, let’s try to validate the package execution via SSISDB, right clicking on the project itself and selecting “Validate…”. This is the result of the empty script package validation:

blog_ssis_error_007.PNG

I’ve tried on six different machines, five ran successfully and ONLY ONE returned the above error message. Still stuck in the middle.

What have we changed?

Just the setup of SSMS (17.8.1) updating the 17.7 one. Once again, the same setup on all six machines. Five by six worked, this one is trying to kill me.

For some strange reason, something (I assure you all, not someone) has changed the registry in the .ispac application association, maybe when double clicking for the first time the file in a pending reboot (?). We’re still investigating, since we used to avoid any change in production without permissions and processes. That said, it’s weird. And it was so difficult to get.

Solution

Easy to say, now that we’ve figured out the root consequence. Not so good, but changing the registry on the key HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.ispac with the 130 executable (IntegrationServices.ProjectDeploymentFile.130) fixed the unwanted behavior. The key has been set to IntegrationServices.ProjectDeploymentFile.140 right after the update from 17.7 and 17.8.1.

Instead of changing it via regedit, you can try an “open with…” with “use default” checked in order to force the association between .ispac file and the right ISDeploymentWizard.exe version. But this time, in this machine, it didn’t work. This is the reason why I tried the regedit action.

Conclusions

I have to say a big thanks to Andrea Amantini, one of my peer, which is well known for his ability to find out “a needle in a haystack.”. Strange things happened here. A combination of Murphy’s law, a sort of “black” friday and a pending reboot. Hopefully this helps someone, at least.

DevOpsHeroes see you next year!

DevOpsHeroes see you next year!

Event details

DevOpsHeroes has been a great event. We didn’t expect so many people and we could not imagine that the feedback would be so good. Quick facts:

  • Subscription: 150
  • Attendees: 93
  • drop: 38%

Attendees’ County/Region (breakdown):

partecipanti-geografia.png

Attendee’s satisfaction

The following radar chart is about the event date, location, quality of the sessions, quality of the speakers, food, hospitality, event design and kits:

soddisfazione

As we can see, the overall satisfaction is really high (4/5) and everything on the venue was rated higher!

Indeed, we’ve received a good feedback also for the following questions:

  • will you attend again?
    • Sure, 26%
    • Most likely, 52%
    • Likely, 20%
  • will you suggest the event to other people?
    • Sure, 59%
    • Most likely, 32%
    • Likely, 9%

Additionally, we’ve got 87% of new entries, awesome!

Some considerations

We have to work for the next year’s edition, in order to improve our organisation, but in the end we did very good. The number of event feedback is close to the total number of attendees, so they can be considered the source of any suggestion.

Speaking about tech sessions, including the speech made by Martin Woodward, we’ve received a set of important suggestions. We already know, our speakers are skilled and passionated, but how can we understand the people’s opinions without these surveys?

I’ve spent last two nights in browsing and reading hundreds of those sheets (almost 500, thanks again). Each of them has the following questions:

  • Did the session meet your expectations?
  • Was the topic interesting?
  • Was the speech valuable?
  • What about the quality of the presentation?
  • How’s the speaker? Funny, expert, teacher, motivator, storyteller?

As we can see in the picture below, left side, the overall satisfaction is very high once again (expectations, interesting, valuable and presentation). On the right side, we notice that our speakers are considered experts and somehow funny and storyteller:

screen-shot-2017-10-28-at-02-07-53-e1509149570123.png

Conclusions

We’re really proud of the second edition of DevOpsHeroes. Engage IT Services and Upgrade did a great job together, and, hopefully, both companies will cooperate in the future in order to provide new formats and events like this one. A special thanks goes to Martin Woodward (Microsoft), which “crossed the seven seas” for being with us, and also to HPE for sponsoring and supporting the organisation. A great kudos goes to Silvio Di Benedetto and Giuliano Latini, who managed and followed the live streaming and the session recordings (coming soon here).

Download sessions, pics and the event stuff here.

Last but not least, thanks to GetLatestVersion.it, DotDotNet.org and also WindowServer.it which allowed us to get DevOpsHeroes in the best shape possible.

See you next year!

Events after the summer holidays

Events after the summer holidays

Summer holidays are coming, finally. This year I’m really tired, maybe because I’ve spent my energies on learning English, working hard for my own Company, following external school and non-school projects. But I can say that one of the most heavy part has been the organization of the following two events:

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